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Thread: BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

  1. #41

    BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

    Dave Smith wrote: Perhaps us BMAA rascals aren't as trustworthy as those decent LAA fellows?
    ;-)
    Dave
    Don't forget the initiative, proposal and push to scrap weighing has come from BMAA - not LAA or CAA.

    Paul

  2. #42
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    BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

    Who's telling porkies then?

    The LAA says it was a joint proposal and the current regime remains in place until final agreement is reached.

    http://www.lightaircraftassociation....ews/micro.html

  3. #43

    BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

    No porkies at all BMAA took it to the LAA to get them on side as part of the process so it had more 'weight' (!) to get past CAA, but the initiative came from BMAA - started a couple of years ago ( maybe earlier with the a time for change paper) and Ben has been the primary architect of the detail of the proposal. I was involved a bit when I was on council as member of the tech subcommittee, so I have witnessed it's gestation. Geoff and co had to do quite a bit of kicking CAA to get it up the priority pile after we were getting frustrated that they had had it for too long.

    Paul

  4. #44
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    BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

    That's one question answered. What about the LAA giving a year grace period? Their website says "..., the current re-weighing regime remains in place."

  5. #45

    BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

    I hate to burst the MOT bubble but there is no get out clause for us guys so don't you believe it we are even responsible for your rusty brake pipe repairs should they burst during the test work that one out. We are accountable for mechanical defects and for corrosion for quite some time after the test and there are stations taken to task all the time it is just not advertised/ news worthy

  6. #46
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    BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

    Joan Walsh wrote: Kev, tax disc thing didn't come in until PNC, DVLA, and ANCR computers were all talking to each other.
    Microlight weighing depends on CAA believing that manufacturers declare accurate weight when new, and then BMAA/LAA keeping accurate modification records.

    After having learned my aero engineering with heavy and fast stuff*, I remember that when I first entered the world of microlighting I was amazed that nobody seemed to care about the weight of modifications. I really thought it strange that people could advertise bolt-on goodies, such as strobes or electric starters, in MF without anybody asking what weight they added.

    As far as I understand, too, aircraft with a significant amount of composites in their structure start to get 'fat' in middle age... a problem many of us can empathise with :-)

    Joan

    * not really fast unless it can do supersonic at sea level :-)
    There is no weighting requirement in Lithuania and pilots install/mount lots of stuff like mentioned above. I simply tell them - OK, you have mounted a nose cone to your trike. It weights around 4 kg. Just imagine you want the same amount to make flying, how large wing area you'd need? Now, cut this area out of the wing from your trike ... .

    The absence of weighting in Lithuania ended up to "fat" microligts. Nobody knows what to do now - it is not right to ground them and it is not fair to let them fly when weightshift a/c are following regulations strictly. By the way, I saw a para-motor trike recently which was taking off with TOW 510 kg ... . They call it "progress" ...

    I have read Paul's insights and highly agree with need with EDUCATION of pilots. Making them flying is not enough. I'm just afraid that people who know taste of creation and joy of flight are going away and in near future there will be nobody to tell them that going heavy and fast is not the key stone of microlighting.

    Regarding inspections. According my opinion CAA should not be involved into inspection process. I think that should be business of an association only, pilots should take all responsibility on condition of their a/c and inspectors should act as consulting knowledgeable persons only.

  7. #47
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    BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

    Perfectly put...

  8. #48
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    BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

    We in the UK seem to have lost the concept of learning from our peers. Education translates as formal teaching by an instructor. We'll end up with mandatory ground school and stricter written tests if we're not careful. We might even end up with the NPPL 1hr instructional requirement becoming a test. Be careful what you wish for.

    It's not education our pilots need, but a desire to learn.

    Joan

  9. #49

    BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

    But a supportive framework to encourage and enable that desire to be satisfied is important. instructirs need to be trained ND educated in the first instance to have the knowledge to pass on, and that I believe has become abit if a problem. Rewind 15 years and all instructors also had to be mechanics, and were well versed in how to look after an aeroplane and what makes it tick and how to rig and derig, service it etc. We have seen a steady drift to instructors who have never rigged an aeroplane and don't service it themselves, and at some schools they don't even get involved in the basic paperwork, and may never have owned an aeroplane themselves. It means we have seen a steady erosion of the knowledge passed on to students who then go on to buy their own aeroplane. We need to consider how best to ensure that they do get the information they need without being left to their own devices to hunt it out.

    Paul

  10. #50

    BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

    But how do we know which of our peers are right and which are wrong?

    Joan Walsh wrote: We in the UK seem to have lost the concept of learning from our peers. Education translates as formal teaching by an instructor. We'll end up with mandatory ground school and stricter written tests if we're not careful. We might even end up with the NPPL 1hr instructional requirement becoming a test. Be careful what you wish for.

    It's not education our pilots need, but a desire to learn.

    Joan

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