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Thread: CAA looking at Deregulate the pilot licensing of small single occupant aircraft

  1. #1

    CAA looking at Deregulate the pilot licensing of small single occupant aircraft

    Read it here:
    http://ukga.com/news/view?contentId=35264

    Any idea what it means?

  2. #2

    CAA looking at Deregulate the pilot licensing of small single occupant aircraft

    Read the ANO review document the links take you to and there is explanation.

    Personally I think removing a license requirement for SSDR would be a bad thing. The basis of us proving the initial case for SSDR to CAA and Dft was made on evidence that training had the big safety impact not airworthiness regulation. There are also potential problems of insurance and access to aerodromes for SSDR if there was no license required.

    However the review also asks about SPHG ( paramotors and footlaunched powrred hangliders) and whether mandatory licensing should be introduced for them. Or a mandatory air law exam pass. Here I am personally inclined to think that mandatory licensing would be less useful, there being an intrinsic level of risk mitigation from low energy, and difficulty of enforcement. However the air law exam might have merit. Compliance would be low cost and nit difficult, and it would remove concerns about inadvertent flight into airspace, and nuisance from ignorance of the

    I also think that it might be a good idea for powered parachute single seaters to be considered for not requiring a license. It's widely ignored now - lots flying and very few have licenses. And they are largely very easy and safe to fly - but against that it is really only because so far they are very low energy. Canopies are getting smaller and speeds higher and a sub 10m PPC with a 582 might be capable of quite high speeds and being far less foolproof to fly..

    Paul

  3. #3

    CAA looking at Deregulate the pilot licensing of small single occupant aircraft

    The only link I found on that page took me to the CAA site and then I lost the will to live. It's like when Geoff posts links to links to links )

    I think removing a licence requirement for SSDR would be very bad. We'd end up with the problems they used to have in the states with lots of deaths. What keeps us safe is the licence or, more correctly, the rigour of student training required to get the licence. Much as with motorbikes when they introduced the 1 day compulsory training (CBT) many years ago now the number of serious/fatal accidents reduced by about 90% (I was told this, have not verified myself).

    It's bizarre, I'm all for getting rid of red tape but let's not throw away the stuff that actually does keep us safe! The fact that they've even suggested it ahead of other red-tape reductions makes me worry about whether they know what they're doing.

    Training on non-factory-built aircraft (is that in progress now?) is a no-brainer. If it's ok to take your friend's kid up in it then it's good enough for an instructor to teach you to fly in it!

  4. #4

    CAA looking at Deregulate the pilot licensing of small single occupant aircraft

    Training on homebuilts is part of the ANO consultation - please make the effort to find it read it and respond to the consultation supporting that. Several of those nice A1 microlight companies are opposing such a change - so it only stands a chance of happening if we respond positively.

    https://www.caa.co.uk/docs/33/CAP%20...O%20Review.pdf

    Not co pletely sure where they are coming from with the licensing thing, but maybe it's achance to raise the issue of paramotor training without wanting to think they are picking on them?

    Paul

  5. #5
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    CAA looking at Deregulate the pilot licensing of small single occupant aircraft

    Paul Dewhurst wrote: Canopies are getting smaller and speeds higher and a sub 10m PPC with a 582 might be capable of quite high speeds and being far less foolproof to fly..
    That's true, but would it remain foot launchable by the average paramotor pilot?

    The average pilot with a back pack with a 582 in it and a 10m^2 canopy will need to have serious body strength and the ability to spring like Linford Christie in his heyday to take off or land without face planting.

  6. #6
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    CAA looking at Deregulate the pilot licensing of small single occupant aircraft

    "The average pilot with a back pack with a 582 in it and a 10m^2 canopy will need to have serious body strength and the ability to spring like Linford Christie in his heyday to take off or land without face planting" :rofl:

    Personally I welcome any form of Deregulation in our Sport, however when the council in their wisdom had a chance to assist in making Permit Time, just a little more flexible. They choose not to. The BMAA is a member funded organisation paid by ALL of US. Next time perhaps a little consultation of the members would be a little more Democratic. Such as Terry Viners poll, on paying instalments on membership. Well done Terry.

  7. #7

    CAA looking at Deregulate the pilot licensing of small single occupant aircraft

    Steve Uzochukwu wrote:
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Dewhurst
    Canopies are getting smaller and speeds higher and a sub 10m PPC with a 582 might be capable of quite high speeds and being far less foolproof to fly..
    That's true, but would it remain foot launchable by the average paramotor pilot?

    The average pilot with a back pack with a 582 in it and a 10m^2 canopy will need to have serious body strength and the ability to spring like Linford Christie in his heyday to take off or land without face planting.
    PPC Steve - the ones with the wheels.... That was the whole thrust of my post, making a distinction between footlaunched and wheeled.

    Paul

  8. #8

    CAA looking at Deregulate the pilot licensing of small single occupant aircraft

    Having done my NPPL on a Quantum to qualify me to fly a Dragonfly I became convinced of the need for a SSDR-level NPPL. It took me a long time to learn to get a Quantum onto the ground in an airmanlike fashion but I could have learnt to do it with a Dragonfly in about an hour. I have spent the last 300 hours flying an aircraft with no pod, no screen, no passenger, no magnetos, no brakes, no foot-throttle, no trimmer and no instruments with a 4-stroke engine that is warmed up after one minute year-round and which lands at walking pace. It does have a retractable undercarriage of course, which the Quantum did not prepare me for. To me it was like learning on a Learjet and keeping current on a Chipmunk.

    I have let my two-seat rating lapse because I just don't need it and I would now struggle greatly to fly a 'proper' flexwing, it would be like starting from scratch.

    The problem is, of course, that SSDR now includes 'proper' flexwings of much greater mass and speed and some very tricky 3-axis types. How on earth could a licensing system be flexible enough to grant my wish now? I don't think I'd like to see an unlicensed pilot getting into Rick Goddin's new toy.

  9. #9

    CAA looking at Deregulate the pilot licensing of small single occupant aircraft

    Link doesn't work - may be an issue with the CAA site or perhaps a duff link. Do you have another way to get to the doc? Will happily write to support training on non-factory built machines, and will encourage those within the club to do so also.

  10. #10

    CAA looking at Deregulate the pilot licensing of small single occupant aircraft

    Just google cap1271, or ANO review or try this https://www.caa.co.uk/docs/33/CAP%20...O%20Review.pdf

    I just followed the links form your post and I know you are much more tech savvy than me

    Cheers
    Paul

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