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Thread: Changes to the Self Declaration Medical system - 25 August 2016

  1. #251
    Diamond geezer 500 Club
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    What Joan said about checking with the BMAA, but in addition note that Jan 2015 is before the introduction of the current rules which came into force with the revision of the Air Navigation Order in mid-2016(hence the title of this thread!).
    This revision, among other things, dropped the previous distinction between "allowed to fly solo only"" and "may carry passengers". If you can fly then you can carry passengers (well one passenger in a microlight).
    https://www.caa.co.uk/General-Aviati...rivate-pilots/
    That page on the CAA website summarises what's required. In short, no you haven't lied and you can self declare for flying aeroplanes up to 2000kg.
    Last edited by Martin Watson; 10th January 2019 at 10:15.
    Martin Watson
    Microlights in Norfolk
    Fixed Wing Instruction - Exams and GSTs - Revalidations
    07805 716407

  2. #252
    Thanks Joan. I've emailed BMAA already this morning so hoping they get back to me soon. From everything I can gather, there are medical conditions that can affect the safe operation of the aircraft and obviously diabetes is going to be one of them. But upon reading the 18 page documents dedicated entirely to medical cert applicants with diabetes, one would assume that as long as I'm conform to that I am valid and save to fly with self declaration. If I find out that I'm not, then worst case I have to contact CAA to revoke the self declaration and pursue the stricter class 2 medical.

    One thing that I need to check is that I have early background retinopathy, and have received a letter saying I need to have scans to check for maculopathy. According to the fitness to fly bullet points, ie this one:

    * Development of any retinopathy requires CAA ophthalmological assessment and is likely to result in further restriction or unfitness if there is any field loss or reduction in visual acuity
    I'd need to see a CAA Ophthalmologist. I'm still waiting for a hospital appointment regarding said letter.

  3. #253
    Thanks Martin. Since posting that message, I've amended it with the link to the current 2018 version of that document which clears things up a lot more. Essentially, the thing I just need to enquire about now is my eyes as per my message above

  4. #254
    Diamond geezer 500 Club
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    Harry, I still believe you are over-thinking this. The only CAA requirement is that you can meet the standards for an ordinary driving licence and are not on medication for a psychiatric illness.
    Are you medically fit to drive to the airfield? If yes, then you can self declare.
    (All the other stuff is for holders of other types of licence).
    It may be hard to believe, but the rules are much more relaxed now for us hobby pilots on an NPPL than they used to be.
    Martin Watson
    Microlights in Norfolk
    Fixed Wing Instruction - Exams and GSTs - Revalidations
    07805 716407

  5. #255
    I probably am, and Kelly at BMAA said that self cert is fine as long as it's 2000KG or under. My concern arises when you read the NPPL UK section of the ANO 2016 and also 2018 Diabetes Guidance document; both list things that would render restrictions or 'unfit'. In my case, it's the mention of retinopathy, and whether ANO 2016 is still current and valid; in which then surely Diabetes is an illness that can affect your ability to safely command the aircraft?

    I may need to contact DVLA, as I have never informed them about my early stage retinopathy (which I gather many diabetics get at some point). I don't know if I have to?

  6. #256
    Went into this about a year ago for my daughter and in a nutshell....
    The requirements for driving with type 1 diabetes are such that you test your blood sugar levels prior to every journey, you need to carry orange juice in your vehicle/plane (or whatever you use to raise your bsl) and you need to periodically test your bsl during long journeys.
    Your eyes can be tested by a local optician who has the ability/equipment to carry out a retinopathy eye examination which is coupled with a regular eye test.
    If the driving standards required are met then your flying standards are also met but you do need to inform the dvla approx every 2 years that your still meeting the requirements for your driving/flying, this is standard procedure.

  7. #257
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Morton View Post
    Went into this about a year ago for my daughter and in a nutshell....
    The requirements for driving with type 1 diabetes are such that you test your blood sugar levels prior to every journey, you need to carry orange juice in your vehicle/plane (or whatever you use to raise your bsl) and you need to periodically test your bsl during long journeys.
    Your eyes can be tested by a local optician who has the ability/equipment to carry out a retinopathy eye examination which is coupled with a regular eye test.
    If the driving standards required are met then your flying standards are also met but you do need to inform the dvla approx every 2 years that your still meeting the requirements for your driving/flying, this is standard procedure.
    Thanks for that. Everything you've mentioned I'm familiar with and practice daily. I don't go to the optician often however I have my eyes tested and photoed at least twice a year by the retinal screening program. Everything that dvla say they need to know about they do

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