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Thread: 582 vs 912

  1. #11
    Senior Member 500 Club
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    Lots of terrifying figures here. Nothing that really helps, so here you go. Real Aviators fly anything they can get their hands on. Buy the 582 because you can afford it. Fly it. Be happy.

  2. #12
    Whatever you buy a tip that can help is to study the log books before you realy look at the aircraft. It is too easy to fall in love with an aircraft and buy it almost regardless. Take an inspector to look, but check for yourself as well and you'll end up knowing your aircraft so much better.

    Well worth reading service bulletins, and checking log books to see what has been done it will help you form an opinion on how the owners have looked after aircraft and engine. You'll find bulletins for most flexwing types on P&Ms site
    http://www.pmaviation.co.uk/
    Look under "Downloads"
    Info on Rotax engines you can find here
    http://www.rotax-owner.com/en/suppor...vice-bulletins.

    Good Luck with whatever you go for and as Tom says "Fly it. Be Happy"

  3. #13
    Diamond geezer 500 Club
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomshep View Post
    Real Aviators fly anything they can get their hands on. Buy the 582 because you can afford it. Fly it. Be happy.
    I'm not worried about whether anyone thinks I'm a real aviator or not. Having spent four weeks grounded, getting the engine off and back on and the crank replacement, I can say from experience that there's a contradiction between flying, being happy and 582 ownership, especially when fixing it in the freezing cold.

    It would be nice if the next generation ATV/snowmobile engine Kev's playing with got wider acceptance and showed the door to the larger two strokes. It would be better for environment too, as we'd then stop blowing significant amounts of two stroke oil into the atmosphere.

    Don't get me wrong, the smaller two strokes like the Corsair, Polini and Cisco are modern marvels of lightness, and easy to fix. They are key to SSDR & sub-70.

  4. #14
    Member Settling in
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    Bump...

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Uzochukwu View Post
    ... snip ...
    Here are the figures for a crank that lasts 500 hours every time:

    (Table at http://forums.bmaa.org/showthread.ph...l=1#post129220)
    So the break even, by that estimate, is between 500 and 750 hours if you are buying new. For many microlight pilots that could be more than their whole flying career over many years.

    Of course if you are buying second hand the equation changes. It also depends if you pay for maintenance or you treat it as part of the hobby (or, in my case, have a hubby who treats it thus ).
    The pilot formerly posting as MadamBreakneck
    One-to-one ground school, ground exams , and certificates of experience. PM me for details.

  5. #15
    But the resale value is also much higher ( often as much difference as the cost differential new) so you get a bigger payback when it’s time to sell.

    It’s definitely win win - if you can raise the cash in the first instance..

  6. #16
    Diamond geezer 500 Club
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Dewhurst View Post
    But the resale value is also much higher ( often as much difference as the cost differential new) so you get a bigger payback when it’s time to sell.

    It’s definitely win win - if you can raise the cash in the first instance..
    Who in their right mind would tie up say 50k in an aeroplane they are going to fly 50-100 hours a year in? You could invest it and make 2k pa. I bet nobody factors that into their calculation of cost per hour!

    I seem to recall that in the dim and distant past Microlights were supposed to be the cheap way to get in the air. Not any more.
    Martin Watson
    Microlights in Norfolk
    Fixed Wing Instruction - Exams and GSTs - Revalidations
    07805 716407

  7. #17
    582 vs 912 was the post wasn’t it?

    Skyranger with 582 vs 912 cost difference around 7K

    Resale value at 500 hours or so around 7K different.

    In the meantime you have saved around 10ph in fuel and maintenance. So the 912 owner has won by 5K. And enjoyed better performance, reliability range and usefulness in the meantime.

    So if you can afford the extra investment it pays back substantially.

    And that is why although 582 is still available as an option on lots of aircraft people stopped buying them for new two seaters a long time ago.

    As for cheap microlighting - it’s never been cheaper if you want twobstroke there are lots of machines on the market for less than 5K used.

    And syndicates for modern weather capable 4stroke two seaters provide excellent value for money flying for most people - they can do their 30hours or so all in for less than the cost of hangaring an old thruster.
    Last edited by Paul Dewhurst; 21st May 2018 at 14:32.

  8. #18
    [QUOTE=Paul Dewhurst;

    And syndicates for modern weather capable 4stroke two seaters provide excellent value for money flying for most people - they can do their 30hours or so all in for less than the cost of hangaring an old thruster.[/QUOTE]
    Although of course a Thruster is well able to be tied down outside, unlike so many of the modern heavies, so hangarage does not come into it.

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