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Thread: X-Air Falcon with Jabiru

  1. #11
    Diamond geezer 500 Club
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    Jul 2007
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    Norfolk
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    1,201

    X-Air Falcon with Jabiru

    Fuel consumption depends on many things - how the aircraft is flown, what prop is on it, what the aircraft is that the engine is attached to! Having said that, I know both Xairs and Thrusters with the Jab engine and I'd expect more like 10-11 lph, not 14 lph.

    All aircraft are compromises - I mean its not really possible to say whether one is "better" than another. A T600N will fly a bit faster than an Xair Falcon, but the seats are less comfortable. You'll get a smarter Xair Falcon for your money than T600N because the T600N is factory built and can be used by schools for training (that tends to bump up the price). As a fairly regular flier I'd be happy to own either type.

    There is a sound argument for getting a two-stroke engine if the aircraft is going to do less than about 100 hours a year. Both Xairs and T600Ns can be found with a Rotax 582 engine. Don't believe folk who say they don't trust a two-stroke, it just needs to be looked after.

  2. #12
    Junior Member
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    Mar 2014
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    england
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    X-Air Falcon with Jabiru

    Thanks Martin. Sound advice...

  3. #13
    Banned Banned500 Club
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    A Lancashire lass settled in Essex
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    X-Air Falcon with Jabiru

    Actually, the only engine I've heard of that which copes without maintenance is the old Seagull outboard :-)
    Not powerful enough for our use though.

    As Martin says, 'how the aircraft is flown': for good fuel consumption per hour you should fly smoothly, in balance, carrying no more weight than necessary and no faster than the aircraft really wants to go.

    For best consumption per mile you need to take into account wind velocity at your cruising altitude and that's a more complicated matter which involve you flying faster than your speed for best fuel consumption per hour. To illustrate that, consider a flight into a wind which is the same speed as your best litres per hour speed - you'll need to fly faster just to make some progress. A draggier aeroplane will get a smaller increase in speed for a given increase in fuel flow per hour (all other things being equal), which is one reason why the keener touring pilots will buy the slippiest aircraft they can afford. The X'Air Falcon does not come into that class :shakehead:

    Joan

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