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Thread: Microlight Exams

  1. #1
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    Microlight Exams

    Hi Guys and Gals

    In 3 weeks time i am off to a hot, dry and very sandy place for my 4 month 'inforced' summer holiday. I will have loads of time to study and learn the 5 exam modules (Air Law, Aeroplanes Technical, Navigation, Meteorology, and Human Performance and Limitations). The question i have is, on my return am i allowed to take the exams before i start flying lessons and obtain a certificate to prove i have done them (a bit like doing a car theory test, only these are more important), or do i have to take them at certain stages of flight training?

    Sorry if it seems a daft question, but with all that time on my hands i want to do something creative with it.

    Regards

    Dave

  2. #2
    not real name 500 Club
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    Dave, you can take them at any time that you like but you will find them more difficult if you haven't done the relevent lessons.
    John

  3. #3
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    Dave as far as i can recall you can take them any time with your instructor but i think there is a time limit on there validity, my way of thinking is that you can do them whatever the weather, not like the flying. best to space them out in stages with your flying and do them on the bad weather days. alf.

  4. #4
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    Alf, I don't think there is a time limit as my lessons and exams were spread over a year of evenings and weekends, but I wouldn't lay my life on it ;-)
    John

  5. #5
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    Guys

    I just looked this up in "Air law for Microlight Pilots". A pass in a theory paper has a validity of one year.

    So, as long as you can complete your practical learning and pass the GFT (practical test) in less than a year of taking and passing the theory tests, then everything will be OK. But this is not generally how folk do it, because you really don't know how long its going to take you to get the flying lessons and experience you need - UK weather being what it is. It would be a shame to have to take them again if you dont complete the GFT in time. Also as John said the theory makes more sense when it can be reinforced by practical demonstration and so on.

    Nothing to stop you doing a lot of theory reading and learning while you have the time in your hot and sandy place to get a really good understanding of things, come back to UK and get started with flying lessons, and then revise and take the theory exams as your flying progresses.

    Winter is a good time for flying lessons (surprisingly) cos no bumpy thermals to confuse things, and you often get gin clear days when it is fantastic flying. BTW if you have done the work the theory exams are pretty straightforward - no trick questions, just giving you the chance to show that you know what is needed.

    Good luck

    Martin

  6. #6
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    Martin Watson wrote:

    Nothing to stop you doing a lot of theory reading and learning while you have the time
    Hi,

    Just a quick question. Does Brian Cosgroves Microlight Pilot's Handbook give you enough information to pass all the exams? If not what other books would it be benificial to study?

    Cheers kevin.

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    Kevin that all depends on the in Individual, i would say its a "must" to have to grasp the basics, but me Personally 'of only average intelligence' had one hour in the classroom with the instructor, and two hour classroom on the navigation. alf.

  8. #8
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    Cosgrove certainly is essential, but I feel it only really covers the basics. The AFE series of books for private piot training worked well for me - they are aimed at General Aviation wannabee pilots, but cover stuff in more detail and you can just ignore the bits you dont need. The Air law for Microlights book I referred to earlier is from AFE too.

    Martin

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the replies everyone,

    Martin Watson wrote:

    Cosgrove certainly is essential, but I feel it only really covers the basics. The AFE series of books for private piot training worked well for me - they are aimed at General Aviation wannabee pilots, but cover stuff in more detail and you can just ignore the bits you dont need. The Air law for Microlights book I referred to earlier is from AFE too.

    Martin
    Hi Martin.
    Thanks for the advice.As a beginer, and someone who hasn,t had a lesson yet, how would I know which bits to ignore?
    I wouldn't want to fill my brain with stuff that's usless to me when there's barely enough room for the useful stuff!!!
    Cheers, Kevin.

  10. #10
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    Kevin O'Connor wrote:

    Thanks for the replies everyone,
    Hi Martin.
    Thanks for the advice.As a beginer, and someone who hasn,t had a lesson yet, how would I know which bits to ignore?
    I wouldn't want to fill my brain with stuff that's usless to me when there's barely enough room for the useful stuff!!!
    Cheers, Kevin.

    To find out which bits are relevant you will need a copy of the Microlight NPPL Training Syllabus to check against to books. You can obtain that here
    http://www.bmaashop.org/
    As most folks have said almost everthing that you will need is in Brian Cosgroves book. The main exceptions to this are in Air Law as ammended in an ANO published this year. You can find this in the files section of the Microlight Yahoo group
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/microlights/
    listed as
    ANO 2008 BMAA.pps
    or as suggested in an earlier reply in Geoff Weighell's book Air Law for Microlight Pilots by AFE
    One thing that a lot of people find a challenge at first is that aviation is splattered with acronyms. A lack of understanding of these when used in flying books and speak can slow the learning process so you may find this site useful
    http://www.pplmania.com/ppltrainer/glossary-terms-c.htm
    Something else that could prove useful would be to obtain a "whizz wheel", chart, ruler and protractor and a marker pen (Staedtler permanent will dry wipe from a chart) and do a load of practice navigations you will be able to get the days weather from the met office site useing TAFs and Forms 214 and 215
    http://secure.metoffice.com/aviation/report.jsp
    and get used to useing the AIS site for NOTAMS.
    http://www.nats-uk.ead-it.com/public/index.php.html
    Once you get used to it it's quite easy
    Not only will this help you pass your Nav. exam it will help you once you have your licence
    I know that this assumes that you are conected to the web, but I hope that it may help
    Ginge[/quote]

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