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  • Petrol flow meter

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    Hi has anyone used a petrol flow meter to see the petrol uses and how to fly most economical?
    Flip

  • #2
    Petrol flow meter

    Hi Flip,

    Nearly all the competition guys have had a go at fuel computers at on time or another and if you want to learn to save fuel that's just up their street as one third of all comps are about fuel management in the form of prediction or endurance.

    Its not unusual to achieve fuel burn of a lot less than 5 ltrs an hour out of the two strokes and the best way to get an idea is to measure the fuel you put in the tank and then relate that to time or distance depending on what you are after.

    The cheaper fuel computer employs a vane type of rotor which gets less accurate the less fuel you use.

    Pop along to your nearest comp and have a go or just chat.

    World Championships at Popham next month but don't ask when they are flying tasks !!
    Mick Broom
    Member 909
    Shadow G-MWTN

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    • #3
      Petrol flow meter

      Can you give me some details as to what they use. I'm looking for something that can measure up to 20 litres per hour with a current uses gauge that tells me how much I use at that time...

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      • #4
        Petrol flow meter

        Reading 20 ltrs an hour should not be a problem, I can see why you want to save fuel ;-) though you may miss out completely on only 2ltrs

        If you google the pilot supplies I am sure you will find one and if you want to play yourself RS Components used to sell the bit that measures it all.

        Three methods, the one above which uses vanes, the accurate and very expensive positive displacement type which uses gears and this requires a bypass system so you can switch supply if you have a failure and the cheap way of just measuring what you put in the tank.

        You can do it visually if you build a transparent feed tank which is thin and tall with a stopwatch after calibration.

        All the systems require calibration of some sort and then come with their own personal baggage in ease of use and accuracy.

        What you need to avoid is a gauge which does not tell the truth as that's a lot worse than nothing.

        Try a flight in a glider for tips on saving fuel.
        Mick Broom
        Member 909
        Shadow G-MWTN

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