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  • How long will it take to learn?

    Well, the minimum requirement for a Microlight licence is 25 hours of flying logged, of which at least 10 must be flown solo; 2 qualifying cross country flights with outlandings, of 25 and 50 Kms, and to pass 5 written examinations. Finally you must pass a GST (General Skills Test) where an examiner asses your flying skills. If you go somehwre with a good, reliable, flyable climate, and are a quick learner prepared to work hard - well, it's not unheard of to qualify in 3 weeks from start to finish. If on the other hand you remain in the UK, and therefore at the mercy of the weather, it might take years!

    OK, so that's the silly extremes. A realistic estimate would probably be 6 to 12 months for most people.

    Instructors - please reply to this post to correct me as appropriate.

  • #2
    How long will it take to learn?

    A bench mark I was given was about 1 hour per year of your age.

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    • #3
      How long will it take to learn?

      Adam Curtin wrote:

      The minimum for a full microlight licence is 25hrs, but there's a restricted licence which needs a minimum of 15hrs.

      The restrictions on the restricted licence when surface wind >15kt; when cloud base <1000ft; when visibility <10km.
      And you mustn't fly more than 8nm from where you took off!
      [/b]open to abuse !!![/b]



      Speaking with past knowledge of my own training, I would think that at 15hrs the majority of flyers are not competent enough to be consistently left alone to fly as/when they want.

      P others that they are new to the air?[/b]

      The P is for Probationary drivers on the Road and allows other drivers to be aware of them being newbies.

      Maybe 15hr licence holders could have a P affixed to their microlight to alert other pilots that they are newbies.



      The P on the microlight could establish that the pilot is not competent yet !!!

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      • #4
        How long will it take to learn?

        These are of course minium requirements. To hold a restricted licence the pilot must pass their GST and so have proved their competence to an examiner.
        It allows those who are short of cash to split their training into two more afordable segments. Another advantage to some pilots is that having gained a restricted licence all the written exams are acepted and cannot run out of time forcing a retake. For students that have reached this stage at, say, the start of winter, this can be a sicnificant help. Particuly for those with a supportive club this is a worthwhile route to a full licence and has worked well for many years.
        Ginge

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        • #5
          How long will it take to learn?

          Given that there are a lot of variables for the length of time it takes to learn to fly what would be peoples recommendations for these two questions 1) at what point to buy your own aircraft, and 2) do you get something old so it doesn't matter so much if you have a hard landing etc., or do you go straight for your 18,000 dream machine? I am early days of Flexwing training although a few moons ago I held a PPL(A).

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          • #6
            How long will it take to learn?

            I went solo at 11 hours and did my GST at 17 hours total time, having done 1.5 hours solo.

            The whole process took just over 3 months. I still had to complete the rest of the solo hours after GST and did XCs for much of this. My application went off with both dual and solo minimums just exceeded.

            If you fly once a month, it will take you years, if you fly 2 or 3 times a week, it can be done very quickly, even allowing for bad weather breaks.

            I bought my first aircraft after GST but before getting my license back. Many schools want you to solo on your own machine, which may influence the timing. I was taking snatched periods out of work, to suit the weather, instructor availability and my workload, so rigging/de-rigging would not have been an option for me.

            The main restricted license requirement is 'no passengers'. For the sake of two 40 mile cross countries, I fail to see why anyone would have one of these.

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            • #7
              How long will it take to learn?

              Jeremy wrote:
              Peter,
              Finally, you don't fly microlights,Peter says...I fly anything, if it flys I trys it. haven't undergone microlight licence training as far as I know,Peter says...Correct I haven't undergone microlight training. so are probably applying "big aircraft" thinking to this.Peter says...Possibly I am. Microlights are low energy aircraft, with generally benign handling and no complex systems or engine management to worry about.Peter says...The MCR Bambi and the Pioneer 300 are as Complex and as fast as more than most GA Singles. As such, the pilot workload is very much less than that involved in flying something like a PA28 or C172.Peter says...Funny that!!! Steve O thinks that my PA28 is considerably easier to fly than his Foxbat,we will have to see if his Foxbat Sport will be easier to fly?

              Jeremy

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              • #8
                How long will it take to learn?

                Somebody wrote: 1) at what point to buy your own aircraft
                My reply from similar post:

                Personally, I would recommend using the schools machine for your dual training. You have enough to think about during your lessons without having the responsibility of owning an aircraft, i.e. making sure it is and stays airworthy for you and your instructor. Also, owning your own machine means you have to arrive earlier so you can get it all prepared and do your pre-flight checks, and put it all away again after your lesson, which might not be good if you are pushed for time.

                Getting your own aircraft for going solo is a better idea, then you're not restricted to the schools aircraft which might not be available all the time. Plus going solo in your own is a hell of a lot cheaper than using the schools. I bought my own aircraft when I was nearing the end of my dual training and did my final two dual exercises in that, which helped me gain familiarity before I did my first solo.

                Somebody wrote: 2) do you get something old so it doesn't matter so much if you have a hard landing etc., or do you go straight for your 18,000 dream machine?
                I think you should maybe buy what you can afford at the time. I fortunately had the money (one time only) to buy my dream machine. If I didn't buy it when I had the chance then I probably wouldn't have had the opportunity to buy it again for quite some time, if ever. The type of aircraft you buy will also be determined by what type of flying you want to do when you become qualified, do you just want to fly locally or do you want to go places and do a lot of touring, etc, etc?

                Cheers,

                Robert

                Comment


                • #9
                  How long will it take to learn?

                  [quote=bar shaker]
                  The main restricted license requirement is 'no passengers'. For the sake of two 40 mile cross countries, I fail to see why anyone would have one of these.
                  That's an incomplete representation of the rule. The rule is that on a restricted licence you cannot take a passenger (other than instructor) until you have logged 25hrs microlight flying (including 10hrs as P1) and it is signed off in your logbook by an R-examiner. I took many people as passengers on the restricted licence I held for a couple of years before going for my cross countries.

                  Some people don't think it's worth getting the aeroplane ready for a short flight, others, especially pilots of 'classic' microlight types find 8nm is not really an inhibiting factor. I found I could happily fly my Thruster TST for a whole hour within the 8nm boundary and never fly twice over the same spot.

                  A good reason for going for the restricted licence has already been mentioned earlier by Ginge, namely stopping the clock on your exams and solo training. My advice is always, get your GST and licence as soon as you're ready - if you've done your solo cross countries by then great, if not, don't hang on just for the sake of getting the full licence - it costs nothing but the instructor's fees and the flights to upgrade later. I've seen too many people have to redo their exams and solo hours because of the winter weather getting in the way of training.

                  Don't be ashamed to go for the restricted licence first.

                  Joan

                  Edited following double-checking the rules in LASORS

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                  • #10
                    How long will it take to learn?

                    At the risk of dragging out an old cliche - you will never stop learning!

                    Tom

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                    • #11
                      How long will it take to learn?

                      ....which is why I went abroad. Did a week with Gerry Breen in Portugal, and had a huge mental block on landing so didn't even get to solo. Didn't fly for a year, then went to Reg Whittal in La Fleche for two weeks and came away with a full licence. In my experience it was cheaper than faffing about in the UK.

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                      • #12
                        How long will it take to learn?

                        My own personal experience is 38 hours over 22 months and still not even solo (Age 39.9). According to my log book I get flights in Summer and Autumn 3 times a month or so, winter and spring is pretty poor especialy Feb. I'm sure my lack of talent spreads this out, and I well undertand the skill fade. The spread does have a number of benefits in my opinon, helps cash flow, keeps my wife and family reasoanbly happy and allows me to fly in a very broad range of weathers, in the area I will fly once I have my license.

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                        • #13
                          How long will it take to learn?

                          Hi Nick,

                          I am a bit of a kindred spirit. 33 hrs and not solo yet. Very close though, all exercises done, all exams passed, just a bit of a mental block on last 1ft of landings. I am 44 and I have heard that 1hr per year of age is a rule of thumb so maybe we havent got long to go :freaked:

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                          • #14
                            How long will it take to learn?

                            Funny that, same problem as me, although mines the last 2 meters according to my instructor.

                            Good luck

                            Nick

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                            • #15
                              How long will it take to learn?

                              Somebody wrote: Funny that, same problem as me, although mines the last 2 meters according to my instructor.
                              I think most people will have some story to tell on the subject of landing, especially during the last few feet. :freaked:

                              Robert

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