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  • #16
    Can I put a runway in my back garden?

    Hi, Why a limited Company ?

    This will cost you more money, the cost for setting the business up around 300 for the name and registration, then there will be business insurance with public liability, you will also have present accounts even if nil to a accountant and send them on to companies house.

    Probably cheaper to find a cheaper insurance quote.

    Regards Chris

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    • #17
      Can I put a runway in my back garden?

      Yeah, find cheaper insurance. If you're set about going down the company route, what about a limited liability partnership?

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      • #18
        Can I put a runway in my back garden?

        All
        Many thanks for your suggestions.
        Limited Company with no assets is unlikely to be sued by a third party using a 'No Win No Fee' company.
        The objective is to protect the landowner's assets, he will then re-open the airfield.
        Regards
        Mike

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        • #19
          Can I put a runway in my back garden?

          28 per month (each) doesn't sound a huge amount to indemify the landowner. Some people pay more than that for broadband access, or on a mobile phone contract, or house contents insurance. But I bet XLR fliers have a lot more fun for that money :-).

          [Where is this, roughly, by the way?]

          Mike

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          • #20
            Can I put a runway in my back garden?

            The landowner has insisted that insurance cover be doubled to two million pounds. The new premium will be approx. 2,000pa with Haywards. Unfortunately, this will be more than 4 pilots can afford. Consequently after 22 years as a Microlight airfield Terrington Marsh (near Terrington St Clement, King's Lynn) is now closed.

            Fortunately the airfield at Wingland (Green Dyke road, Lutton near Long Sutton, Lincs) has a couple of spare slots. I'm going to be semi-rigged there sometime this week.

            Regards
            Mike

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            • #21
              Can I put a runway in my back garden?

              I'm sorry to hear that Mike; do you think the farmer was trying to get rid or just following inaccurate advise?
              John

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              • #22
                Can I put a runway in my back garden?

                Would not a signed notorized declaration stating that you would NOT now or ever hold the landowner liable in any event be acceptable then just to ease his mind maybe basic insurance minimum requirements? Surely if drawn up by a local solicitor this would suffice? Basically you would be signing your rights away but hey how can you hold a landowner responsible? Like "hey that ditch was not there yesterday!?" It seems he is being over cautious. It is OUR responsibility to walk the strip EVERY time we use it and confirm its suitability. Of course things can change whilst we are aloft but that can happen any place anytime to anyone!
                I would suggest trying to open a dialogue again on a friendly basis maybe a drink down the local? Explain the ins and outs and in particular HOW YOU UNDERSTAND HIS POINT and offer to sign away liability? See if it works. We did this very successfully in the States for several years... GOOD LUCK GUYS!! Regards and XL's Rule

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                • #23
                  Can I put a runway in my back garden?

                  Surely the fact that all current Pilots flying must have mandatary third party insurane and passenger if a 2 seater should be enough. what else is there to cover unless on course the hangarage belomgs to the farmer in which case he is correct in wanting cover.

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                  • #24
                    Can I put a runway in my back garden?

                    My aircraft insurance (Traffords) provides one million pounds of cover. If I came into land and stuffed my nosewheel into a rabbit hole and the passenger ended up in a wheelchair, one million pounds would not be enough. The landowner did not want his name on the additional two million pounds cover I had been offered by Haywards... game over!

                    The good news is that I flew out to another hangarage at Wingland (Lutton, near Long Sutton, Lincs) on Tuesday. Come and visit us there. No landings fees!

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                    • #25
                      Can I put a runway in my back garden?

                      Could you be so kind and point to that law?
                      I'm working in a group which has to give suggestions to CAA (Lithuania) regarding private take-off&landing strips and airfields regulations (we do not have such in Lithuania yet). They ask about good practice abroad. Could you be so kind and send me any law acts, regulations sketches and so on which are in effect in UK?. Any comments and links to useful web sites are welcome too.

                      Sorry, but I need it ASAP.

                      Thank you in advance for your kind help and support.

                      Kind regards,

                      You are welcom to reply to my e-mail address zelnysk@hotmail.com also

                      Kestutis Zelnys
                      +37061637269

                      Ginge Sunley wrote:

                      The term farm strip covers a broad range of airstrips. Some are run a part of of the farmers business plan in much the same way as the as the small business units in his old farm buildings.
                      These start at a well maintained grass strip with purpose built hangars and a little hut to make a cuppa though to a grass strip at which you can tie down, at some you are invited to build your own hangar. Many of these will have planning permission. Those with planning may have restrictions placed on them by the authority granting the permission, limitations on number of flights and/or hours that flying can take place. So it pays to enquire about the exact conditions applying to each individual strip. Most will also have areas to be avoided so PPR really is a must if you are flying in. Many of these strips were built by the farmer to house his own aircraft and as such are situated on the best drained areas that he knows of. He may well allow other aircraft to base there but if it is not part of his business portfollio it may well operate uder the 28 day rule.
                      The next kind ofton are strips laid down by a flier or bunch of fliers on land either bought or rented from the farmer. These tend to be of a simpler kind and probably most of them do operate under the 28 day rule and are as varied as it is possible to be.
                      Farm strip flying can be great fun but always remember that most strips will have their own little quirks that you will need to learn. What you get are cheaper fees and greater freedom, what you will lack on the smaller strips is ofton the club atmosphere and support

                      Ginge

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                      • #26
                        Can I put a runway in my back garden?

                        [quote=Kestutis Zelnys]

                        Could you be so kind and point to that law?
                        I'm working in a group which has to give suggestions to CAA (Lithuania) regarding private take-off&landing strips and airfields regulations (we do not have such in Lithuania yet). They ask about good practice abroad. Could you be so kind and send me any law acts, regulations sketches and so on which are in effect in UK?. Any comments and links to useful web sites are welcome too.

                        Sorry, but I need it ASAP.

                        Thank you in advance for your kind help and support.

                        Kind regards,

                        You are welcom to reply to my e-mail address zelnysk@hotmail.com also

                        Kestutis Zelnys
                        +37061637269

                        I can give you the two following links concerning the 28day rule the first is the actual act and the second is a simpler explanation of the content
                        http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1.../contents/made
                        http://www.gaac.org.uk/content/?page_id=23
                        The BMAA also publish some documents about planning through their online shop. These are a little bit out of date but provide a good introduction.
                        http://www.bmaashop.org/acatalog/Planning_Guides.html
                        The limitations on use come in when planning permission is granted and that permission is granted dependant on some limitations on use, such as the number of landings and take offs, the hours of use and the avoidance of certain areas being observed.
                        The granting of permission and any limitations attached to that permission is in the hands of the local Council, they have some procedural rules that they must take into account as well. These Councils are local bodies elected to look after local matters within a difined area
                        I hope that is of some help
                        Ginge

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                        • #27
                          Can I put a runway in my back garden?

                          Thanks Ginge You helped me a lot

                          Kind regards,

                          Kestutis

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Can I put a runway in my back garden?

                            No probs, good luck with your project

                            Ginge

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Can I put a runway in my back garden?

                              There are a number of misunderstandings about the law in this thread which if uncorrected could give people the wrong idea.
                              Number 1

                              Trevor Sexton wrote:

                              [2]Although an old thread on rading the first part it,s actually wrong the 28 day does not apply.[/2]

                              [2]If its your own property and you have a big enough area the the laws of [/2]

                              [2][/2]

                              [2]Curtilage would apply. [/2]

                              [2]This is the same law that allows you to drive your 4 x 4 up and down the field as and when you like without anybodys permission as long as its your land..[/2]

                              [2]If you invite friend in then yes the 28 day rule would apply and if you wanted to build a barn (hangar) then you would need planning.[/2]

                              [2] [/2][2]trevor[/2]
                              The 28 day rule actually does apply even if it's your own property. A change of use needs planning permission just like building a house would, and there's no law which says you don't need planning permission just because you happen to own the land in question!

                              Using a field as a runway or as a race track is a non-agricultural use and requires planning permission if carried out in more than 28 days in the year.

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                              • #30
                                Can I put a runway in my back garden?

                                Number 2

                                Mike Faulkner wrote:
                                Airfield Insurance
                                The owner of our Airfield has discovered that he is liable for any accidents on the airfield.
                                This is not how English liability law works (but it may be that the landowner knows that and is using it as an excuse).

                                There does need to be some causal link between the accident and the person being sued! Essentially if you have taken reasonable care then you have a complete defence to any claim for compensation.

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