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Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

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  • Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

    I was interested to read the flight test of the Quik Lite.
    However perhaps judging by his comments, Paul Bennett has deeper pockets than most folk!
    To quote, "With some flexwing prices beyond penurious pilots, Paul Bennett finds a solution in bijou budget beauty the Quik Lite".
    Excuse my ignorance for not knowing what, "bijou" means.
    In his summary Paul makes remarks about what he liked, one being the price.
    The price of the aircraft flown, 23,180.00 :smhair:
    Don't get my wrong it's lovely looking aircraft and we have one based at our airfield but "budget price" come on!
    Oh well. At least at the airfield last night while putting my Ace Aviation Easy Riser back in the hanger (brand new circa 7K) I looked up to see a fantastic single seater Quick Silver bumbling along and the pilot waving enthusiastically at me.
    What a "bijou budget beauty" that was

  • #2
    Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

    Bijou literally means "jewel".

    It's used to denote something small and exquisite - and perhaps valuable.

    Laurie (2)

    Comment


    • #3
      Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

      I have to say, I thought the same. Must be getting tight in my old age

      All these manufacturers have to make a profit, but I would imagine that the development costs for something like that would be very small - if anything
      Using a proven wing and trike unit, all that is changing is a 582 (not exactly a new engine)
      But, its a new aircraft, so is 23k too much for that?

      If they sold it as a kit, then the price really could come down.

      How much should it be?

      Regards, Victor

      Comment


      • #4
        Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

        Its all relative isn't it. Compared to the cost of a two-seat Quik with a 921S, then it looks pretty reasonable. I would think P&M have a real winner in the lite. Its a touring flexwing with masses of storage space, and really, how many flexwings regularly fly two-up?

        Comment


        • #5
          Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

          I thought the whole point of SSDR was low regulation and that would (in turn) bring down the cost?

          If you compare it with a lightly used 2nd hand 912 trike then its expensive.

          I don't think 23k trike should ever be described as 'budget'

          Regards, Victor

          Comment


          • #6
            Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

            Time will tell :-)

            Comment


            • #7
              Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

              Victor Carmichael wrote: I thought the whole point of SSDR was low regulation and that would (in turn) bring down the cost?

              If you compare it with a lightly used 2nd hand 912 trike then its expensive.

              I don't think 23k trike should ever be described as 'budget'

              Regards, Victor
              I couldn't agree more Victor.
              And it is still a 2 stroke.
              There are some very good, low hour Quiks available for well below that price.
              And as for people flying solo, it's nice to be able to have the option of taking a passenger.
              One of the reasons I hear most for pilots going back to permit aircraft is because they want to fly with other people again.

              Comment


              • #8
                Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

                Some want brand new and will ignore second hand, plus some want to escape permits and so on but don't need an instructor's required longevity.

                What bothers most is how tight it is to the now sensible and generous SSDR 300 kilo limit, at 180-198 kilos to fill the fuel tank a rough sum says the pilot has to be 50-60 kilos, if an 82 kilo bod jumped in and took no camping gear they'd be illegal and uninsured if they prang on departure with a full tank or anything over 20 kilos of fuel., in other phases of the trip with less fuel on board, they maybe could claim they'd only just left the ground.

                The thing is certainly strong enough, but strict sums needed otherwise Mr CAA will start to take notice, and might even tighten things up

                My little Ace Magic Cyclone is designed around the old 115kg empty rule, and is way less capable with only 60mph cruise, plus lacks pod and spats. With 35 litres of gas plus 82 kilo nut behind the controls and 115 empty weight it weighs 223.2 kilos, with baggage and accessories maybe 230kilos. It was just over one third to under one half of the price though...

                A machine is needed that sits somewhere between the two, at around 150-170 kilos, it would be similar to the 1990s two stroke two seaters such as the Flash and Rapier, but peeling 30 kilos off the Quik Light's airframe is needed to make it a true adventure / camping/ touring machine. It would drink less too and maybe be happy with 55-60 hp. Pity Ace Aviation don't add glassfibre bits, the Trya trike has glass bodywork but a crude trike with too many steel parts.

                Maybe carbon fibre could rescue the thing? Any road racing cyclist or motocross/trials bike rider will know exactly what I mean when every tiny accessory is analysed for savings. Easy to design clumsily, now we need to design clever. Good fun awaits.

                Kev
                G-KEVA
                BMAA 5696

                "If anybody ever tells you anything about an aeroplane which is so bloody complicated you can't understand it, take it from me: it's all balls."

                R.J. Mitchell :- Designer of the Supermarine Spitfire

                Comment


                • #9
                  Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

                  It's a conundrum. P&M have already spent all the money setting up and maintaining the manufacturing systems and facilities to build permitted aircraft so where is their saving in making a non-permitted plane?
                  It's the manufacturers who concentrate entirely on SSDR - like E-Go - who will be able to offer much cheaper products.

                  Laurie (2) ;-)

                  Victor Carmichael wrote: I thought the whole point of SSDR was low regulation and that would (in turn) bring down the cost?

                  If you compare it with a lightly used 2nd hand 912 trike then its expensive.

                  I don't think 23k trike should ever be described as 'budget'

                  Regards, Victor

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

                    Hi Kev,

                    keep it quiet.....but there have been guys flying Eurostars and C42s on full tanks for years :-)
                    I'm not sure whether the CAA would turn a blind eye to a full tank on an SSDR or not.
                    But if you think about it (in the case of the Quik Lite) the airframe has been tested to much more than 300

                    I'm with you on the carbon fibre if possible!

                    Regards, Victor

                    Kev Armstrong wrote: Some want brand new and will ignore second hand, plus some want to escape permits and so on but don't need an instructor's required longevity.

                    What bothers most is how tight it is to the now sensible and generous SSDR 300 kilo limit, at 180-198 kilos to fill the fuel tank a rough sum says the pilot has to be 50-60 kilos, if an 82 kilo bod jumped in and took no camping gear they'd be illegal and uninsured if they prang on departure with a full tank or anything over 20 kilos of fuel., in other phases of the trip with less fuel on board, they maybe could claim they'd only just left the ground.

                    The thing is certainly strong enough, but strict sums needed otherwise Mr CAA will start to take notice, and might even tighten things up

                    My little Ace Magic Cyclone is designed around the old 115kg empty rule, and is way less capable with only 60mph cruise, plus lacks pod and spats. With 35 litres of gas plus 82 kilo nut behind the controls and 115 empty weight it weighs 223.2 kilos, with baggage and accessories maybe 230kilos. It was just over one third to under one half of the price though...

                    A machine is needed that sits somewhere between the two, at around 150-170 kilos, it would be similar to the 1990s two stroke two seaters such as the Flash and Rapier, but peeling 30 kilos off the Quik Light's airframe is needed to make it a true adventure / camping/ touring machine. It would drink less too and maybe be happy with 55-60 hp. Pity Ace Aviation don't add glassfibre bits, the Trya trike has glass bodywork but a crude trike with too many steel parts.

                    Maybe carbon fibre could rescue the thing? Any road racing cyclist or motocross/trials bike rider will know exactly what I mean when every tiny accessory is analysed for savings. Easy to design clumsily, now we need to design clever. Good fun awaits.

                    Kev

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

                      Hello all,

                      Perhaps P+M should resurrect the old Mainair single seat trike, but stick a Bandit wing on it. Then they've got the performance of a Quik (after all, the Quik wing is a Bandit in disguise) and the lightness of the single seat trike. Also, these are parts for which P+M already have the full specs, and which could be easily manufactured on their production line without having to retool. They could even put on Blade spats and a more modern shaped pod without too much trouble, and then it would look good as well as go. They would also have a range of engines available for such a beast, such as Rotax 503, 582, HKS, or even perhaps an old 447? All of these options could be reflected in the price, and I'm sure it would be considerably lower than 23K.

                      Best regards,

                      Bob Hood
                      XL's forever! Well, one of them anyway. It's all I can afford, not to mention the Raven and the Mini-Max. Oh, and I almost forgot the Spectrum as well :-)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

                        Bob Hood BMAA 3300 wrote: Then they've got the performance of a Quik (after all, the Quik wing is a Bandit in disguise)
                        A Porsche 911 is just a Beetle, right? :-)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

                          Hi Bob

                          Rotax 447 not available anymore
                          Rotax 503 not available anymore
                          HKS? I dont think its available anymore??
                          It would be great if someone could utilise a small 3 cylinder car engine, but I bet the engine manufacturer wouldnt be too keen.....

                          Mainair Scorcher is a lovely trike, but only a dozen were ever made....

                          Grum

                          Bob Hood BMAA 3300 wrote: Hello all,

                          Perhaps P+M should resurrect the old Mainair single seat trike, but stick a Bandit wing on it. Then they've got the performance of a Quik (after all, the Quik wing is a Bandit in disguise) and the lightness of the single seat trike. Also, these are parts for which P+M already have the full specs, and which could be easily manufactured on their production line without having to retool. They could even put on Blade spats and a more modern shaped pod without too much trouble, and then it would look good as well as go. They would also have a range of engines available for such a beast, such as Rotax 503, 582, HKS, or even perhaps an old 447? All of these options could be reflected in the price, and I'm sure it would be considerably lower than 23K.

                          Best regards,

                          Bob Hood

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

                            How about one like this????

                            Attached files

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Flight test of the Quik Lite in the latest addition of Microlight Flying...

                              Doing the rounds at Friedrichshafen shows a number of engines that could be trialled, but the 582 is the easy option.

                              Without some sort of competition, prices will be ever headed upwards. However, if the 582 is about 3k to buy then it's hard to beat.

                              Comment

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