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BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

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  • BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

    http://www.bmaa.org/news_item.php?wnID=9316

    See the news item

  • #2
    BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

    That's great news, thanks guys for lobbying the CAA on our behalf, just a month too late for me as my plane had to be weighed in January.

    Keep up the good work

    Comment


    • #3
      BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

      Just the check flight to go then....
      Sean McDonald

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      • #4
        BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

        Noise Certificate is next and then perhaps we should be looking at annual PtF Revalidation; vital or pointless?

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        • #5
          BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

          This puts us fairly close to TSDR. For what its worth, I think that privately owned two seaters ought to be exempted from the annual PTF revalidation but aircraft used for training should not. Perhaps it (tin 'at on,) it would be worth considering an inspection to be carried out by a competent authority (BMAA inspector, for example,) on sale or transfer of an aircraft to a new owner as a condition of registration change.

          Comment


          • #6
            BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

            Foot launched can be flown dual with no licence, medical, insurance, permit and the pilot can charge the passenger for the flight. The fatal accident rate, the accident rate by which UK aviation is measured, for foot launched is much lower than for Microlights and other GA. Are we afraid of being left to make our own decisions? Footies don't seem to be.

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            • #7
              BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

              Bravo, Geoff.

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              • #8
                BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

                And speaking of no medical...

                http://www.aopa.org/News-and-Video/All-News/2015/February/26/Medical-reform-legislation-introduced-in-House-and-Senate

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                • #9
                  BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

                  What about the license re val as well I made the mistake of swapping to the NPPL m and now have to do the hour with an instructor every 2 years instead of just getting my log book signed.
                  I can understand that being needed if you have done no flying but when you are doing 50 to 150 hours per year to me it makes no sense

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                  • #10
                    BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

                    Hi Geoff
                    When does this become effective?

                    Laurie (2)

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                    • #11
                      BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

                      Many thanks to Geoff and everyone involved with sorting this one out, a good result!

                      If there is an alternative policy to be introduced, is there currently a proposal?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

                        Geoff Weighell wrote: Foot launched can be flown dual with no licence, medical, insurance, permit and the pilot can charge the passenger for the flight. The fatal accident rate, the accident rate by which UK aviation is measured, for foot launched is much lower than for Microlights and other GA. Are we afraid of being left to make our own decisions? Footies don't seem to be.
                        A fairly radical view - even the French would raise an eyebrow at that!

                        Footlaunch of course has a big built in safety feature - it takeoff of and lands at a jogging pace, and that low energy helps reduce the potential for injury during a prang.

                        We on the other hand have 150mph meat missiles with two seats, with many more critical components that need to be designed sensibly and kept in good condition to work well.

                        When we negotiated for SSDR we leant heavily on three things:

                        1. Manufacturers don't stay in business very long if they make planes that kill people, so initial airworthiness doesn't need heavy certification controls to work in practice.
                        2. The historical data shows that training and licensing was the big thing that reduced fatal accident levels to such that it didn't give rise to big headlines in the palates and questions in the house.
                        3. Single seat - and informed consent. The trained pilot has some knowledge and skills, and is within a community that allows them to make informed choice about the aircaft they are flying and the risk they are taking. And without a passenger the third part risk is negligible, and if they kill themselves is it so bad?

                        If we scrapped everything - training, licensing certification and permit inspections, and no one got training, flew deathptraps or created them by lack of maintenance or care then clearly it wouldn't work and microlighting would get a very bad name and sport would wither.

                        So we would be banking that without any regulation that people would get training and train to a high standard before going it alone, and manufacturers would produce good aeroplanes, and owners would look after them.

                        Does regulation set and support good standards and encourage people to do the right thing? - or is it just an unecessary nuisance?

                        i believe that training is necessary and that the current regulations support people doing the right thing, and save the odd hot head from getting ahead of themselves - before they have the knowledge to make that informed decision of when to fly and how to handle the machine safely. There are some petty irritations on how the details and admin work, but that's nothing that can't be refined away, and isn't intrinsic.

                        I think we are over regulated in regards to airworthiness and manufacture. Airworthiness codes in themselves are not a bad thing though, but we could make regulation that was more supportive - the ASTM model is a good example. I do believe that some level of regulation is good idea for two seaters. i believe that a passenger taking their first flight or two isnt in a position to make a informed decision about the level of risk they may be taking and deserve some regulatory safeguards.

                        I think the key is the old chestnut phrase - 'proportional regulation'

                        If we were to abandon all regulation then there are some significant downsides - pax liabilty insurance may suddenly be impossible to get, or extremely expensive, and we would be alone in Europe and not allowed to fly there - the mutual recognition is based on us having training and licensing and our aeroplanes having a permit to fly or equivalent airworthiness document. SSDR has a more restricted legal touring destination list - and without pilots licensing even France would be out if bounds.

                        I think we have a lot of the basic overview right just now - greater controls for two seater operation than single seat. What we do need to do though is to work on the irritating details - challenge every hoop that we have got used to jumping through and see if it can be abandoned or made more user friendly.

                        I do think annual inspections are a very good idea. I would have liked to have seen it on SSDR, but we couldn't find a legal mechanism for it. We all benefit from a second pair of eyes on our machine - even us old dogs, and for new low hours pilots it is more necessary. I pretty much never do an inspection where I don't find something the owner hadn't noticed that is useful for them to have pointed out, and in many cases some pretty major things. It supports the owners in their care and ownership of the machine, and helps reduce risk for their passengers. What we need to focus on is the core job of the inspection. Maybe in the last decade or so it has got perceived as a police check of petty nonesense like fading placards, and radio approvals... We need to work on that aspect not getting the better of us..

                        Paul

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                        • #13
                          BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

                          Paul Dewhurst wrote:
                          I do think annual inspections are a very good idea.
                          A lot of people still invest in them in hang gliding and paragliding where there is no legal obligation (except in Germany) to do so.

                          The same is true of reserve repacks. Microlighting in the UK does not seem to subscribe much to reserves.

                          But there is the flexibility to do them when there's a window, not when regulation hits.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

                            We do hanglider servicing. And often see gliders that people have bought in good faith. We have seen a few in rather scary condition. And we are a bit concerned that a number of SSDR's that we have sold are not doing the maintenance and changing the lifed items the manual calls for ( Ben Ashman wrote a piece for MF on this a while back) But as I say I subscribe to the view if you want to be a twat and kill yourself then that's your business - although the community should provide for education and support so you don't just do it from ignorance.

                            But unlike hang gliders, paragliders and paramotors, the majority of our UK microlight fleet are two seaters, and that's where being a twat needs reducing to levels appropriate for that responsibilty, and it's in the best interest of all of us in the community that people don't mess it up for us, so a bit of proportional regulation may help.

                            The HAWK report shows that UK has the best safety record in the EU for microlight fatals. A lot of that is down to safety culture - but a lot of that culture has been framed by regulation. it was imposed on us with a fair dose of nanny state back in the day,, and certainly isn't perfect, and has previously been hard to re negotiate. If we have opportunity to renegotiate - as it seems we may, we need to think carefully about what we want to lose and what's worth keeping.

                            Your example if a 'window' to get your hanglider inspection done, is just a rule tweak. We already have a 60 day window, and there is no reason why it couldn't be much longer, or bi annual if below a certain hours useage, or whatever.

                            And we need to get rid of silly rules like the 51% amateur build rule for kits. It's purely a british invention for microlights and not an EU law thing - most other countries in the EU don't have it. Here you are apparently a criminal if you pay for a little build help. Makes no safety sense that I can see.

                            Paul

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                            • #15
                              BMAA News item: Microlight routine weighing requirement to be scrapped

                              This is brilliant news.....Please give yourselves a big pat on the back everyone at the BMAA.

                              Great job. Well done. Many thanks for all your hard work.

                              Now I can go and fit that electric starter without worrying how I'm going to lose those extra kgs from somewhere else before the next weighing....!

                              Phil Cater

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