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Forced Landings - Field Selection

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  • Forced Landings - Field Selection

    http://www.fieldselection.co.uk/index.html
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  • #2
    Forced Landings - Field Selection

    Field Landings

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3BhV...ature=youtu.be
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    • #3
      Forced Landings - Field Selection

      After accident yesterday,this is very important to be ready for

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      • #4
        Forced Landings - Field Selection

        Dominic, thanks for the links.

        Dave, I see a Slingsby Firefly came down in N Yorkshire yesterday. Two dead. Not good.

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        • #5
          Forced Landings - Field Selection

          When flying I was always taught to have a field in mind for an EO landing, but I doubt I doubt that many people do; judging by some results we see.
          Personally I find that a ordered sequence remembered is the best approach. Firstly remember the wind direction and note your Compass to re-enforce this. Next don't fly too low - height is time; these two factors can be with you all the time you're flying.
          All the other things after checking why it stopped - switches, fuel, choke, hand throttle etc - such as radio calls (comes early but not overriding the need to 'fly the plane') , and trimming for best glide speed, come before your sudden interest in the ground, and shouldn't take more than a few seconds.
          With the foregoing sorted, look for wires, pylons, their shadows and buildings/roads. If you have spotted a likely field, and it's pasture or a low crop,(you're getting lower now), try to see whether it has a slope, bumps or ditches and is not boggy - or occupants (sheep, cattle, people). Pasture is light green mottled; darker green is a crop (or boggy) and brown may be a recently ploughed or harrowed field. Should your selection be ploughed, land along the direction of the furrows - land across them and you'll end up on your back.
          Having selected a field, lose height on the upwind end by 'beating' but not too close in, trying to keep a touch-down point at around 30 to 45 degrees eyeball - as you lose height you will get closer to the field and any wind will tend to blow you back.
          Not trying to teach anyone to 'suck eggs' but this is my method and I do practice it a fair bit, because I do a GTF every year - and it works for me (mostly).

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          • #6
            Forced Landings - Field Selection

            Good advise, but I would add that I was taught that the correct mnemonic for checks upon engine failure was "FMS"

            "F***%ck Me Sideways"......
            or for gentle folk Fuel Mixture switches":-)

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            • #7
              Forced Landings - Field Selection

              Two pieces of advice gleaned from the gliding fraternity years ago:
              If the ground does not appear flat from over 1000ft above, it's too steep to land on.
              Look out for brown rings in green fields - these usually denote positions of 'invisible' poles that livestock use to rub against.

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              • #8
                Forced Landings - Field Selection

                Another tip maybe but I am no expert

                If there is a field below you they tend to come in groups so pick a field with an alternative beyond the chosen one if you can in case you screw up the first one and it is useful when flying out again. Good for the odd practice as well.

                Personally I always land with no power ( tickover) from circuit hight just to make sure I can get home but also it comes easier to get accustomed to the near same conditions when it stops. I see a lot of pilot doing an Easyjet approach these days were you know when the donkey stops they will destroy the plane.

                If you need to, always check the engine with a bit of full power over an obvious field.

                If the wind is less than say 8Kts land up hill

                One day you never know

                Safe flying
                Mick Broom
                Member 909
                Shadow G-MWTN

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