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Effects of wind shear

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  • #46
    Effects of wind shear

    Thanks Laurie. This is an interesting subject. I made good landings in my first flights in both a C152 and a DR200, which I put down to their higher mass/inertia/kinetic energy compared to the microlights and LSA I normally fly. It just seemed they were less affected by wind gradient.

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    • #47
      Effects of wind shear

      Could you all be missing the obvious, i dont know the strip in question but if there is significant wind shear , and you are set up on a visible approach is there not the possibility that you are using the visual ground speed on approach to balance your approach speed and as the head wind decreases you are not compensating by either taking power or lowering the nose? just asking

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      • #48
        Effects of wind shear

        Keven Gaffney wrote: Could you all be missing the obvious, i dont know the strip in question but if there is significant wind shear , and you are set up on a visible approach is there not the possibility that you are using the visual ground speed on approach to balance your approach speed and as the head wind decreases you are not compensating by either taking power or lowering the nose? just asking
        I would say that the reduction in windspeed on this occasion was very low down - could have been a simple issue of the gradients in the adjacent field diverting the airflow just a few feet above the strip so possibly not wind shear as we know it.

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        • #49
          Effects of wind shear

          When aerotowing we have to deal with very thermic conditions, very light wing loadings and the need to tow into wind as much as possible.

          When flying PGs in very light winds off hills we have the same issues.

          We are unable to leave anything on site as same would get vandalised or removed.

          We tend therefore to use one or two windsocks on carbon poles which take seconds to put up, which are secured to fence posts or put into lengths of pipe driven into the ground. These give wind indicators at 6 to 12 feet above the ground. We also use 1 metre sections of ribbon, either on top level of barbed wire on the the fence or attached to a short pole stuck in the ground, usually with red ribbon for maximum visibility, which give wind flow at 6 foot or below.

          Both solutions are removable for storage, and will give a very good picture of the airflow in and around a landing area.

          Foot launch doesn't tolerate downwind landings unless you are athletic, or lucky or both....

          Wind socks tend to be very light material, with low wind speeds requires for them to inflate or become horizontal as paragliders are unable to fly in stronger winds. They are also much smaller than the ones seen on airstrips.

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