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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I heard recently that the BMAA had taken on the responsibility of re-writing the exam papers for the examinations that are part of the BMAA microlight syllabus, I did see a reference somewhere that hinted that there will be errors if the BMAA are given this role. ( Can't recall where I saw that reference though? )

    Now my question is, I have just heard that the latest Navigation paper that the BMAA have just collated as paper M17C has some errors in it and have been recalled and that the CAA Navigation exam papers have been reintroduced until such times as the BMAA can reprint the corrected versions.

    Apparently Nav paper M17A & M17B are correct so anyone taking a nav exam should insist on the A or B editions to be certain of getting a proper result.

    Is this true or is it just a malicious rumour?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Microlight Exams

    Another tip: when taking my flying exams I found the following rule usually worked:

    If in doubt about the correct answer to a question, choose the one which looks like it's been copied from an official publication - it's usually the verbose option.

    eg. When driving down the motorway you wish to overtake a slower vehicle, do you pass it:

    a) on its left

    b) on its right

    c) usually on its right, but in congested conditions, where adjacent lanes of traffic are moving at similar speeds, and where traffic in left-hand lanes is moving faster than traffic to the right, you may keep up with the traffic in your lane even if this means passing traffic in the lane to your right.

    It's not guaranteed to be right (or left, or wrong), but it's better than a wild guess, and it worked for me

    Joan

    :smurf:

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Microlight Exams

    Hi Dave,

    I found the PPL confuser quite helpful whilst I was doing my exams for my microlight aircraft. Granted the exams ain't as difficult as the group A exams but if your passing them on the confuser I see you having little difficulty on the microlight ones. With that said the confuser should be cross referenced with a microlight manual Brian Cosgrove probably being the standard for most ab-initio pilots.

    As another poster mentioned it's better doing the exams at the level of progression of your flight training. Air law being first and required before solo flight. Again it's a fairly vast subject but if you have something like the confuser to cross reference your manual it's a good way of testing yourself with detailed answers provided.

    When you progress to solo flying a good understanding of the weather,navigation and radio procedures is essential. Your technical knowledge improves as the syllabus progresses. Your instructor will explains the physics involved for every phase of the syllabus. It's also a vast subject but most of the questions are common sense like all the exams.

    I have listed what exams I found hard and ones which were straight forward.

    1 Meteorology (I found this to be the most difficult exam with lots of weather phenomenon to learn.)

    2 Airlaw (Vast subject with lots of legislative policy to learn. I used ANO (Air Navigation Order)for pre study helped immensely)

    3 Aircraft tech POF ( Fairly straight forward but previous flying experience on sailplanes helped me.)

    4 Navigation (once demonstrated by my instructor this was my third strongest subject dropping one question on 1:60 rule also learn chart symbols.)

    5 Human Performance Limitations (Basic understanding of human Physiology is all that's needed.)

    6 Radio (Theory side straightforward, practical you get plenty practice before test and prompts even if your fluffing it on day. This reflects what really happens if your struggling whilst talking to any service, they will squeeze info out of you.)

    Just a small tip on radio, if you find it your weak subject like most trainee pilots do buy a scanner and listen to the local Air ground or ATC frequency, this will help you understand the radio bervity that's used and lets you know where and when you put out standard calls. There is also things like ATIS (aerodrome terminal information service) which you can either tune into or phone this gives you all the runway information QNH who to call and weather, a great learning tool.

    Hope this helps regards Kevin

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Microlight Exams

    Also get the book A-Z of microlighting it's brilliant.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Microlight Exams

    Hi Ginge,
    Thanks for your efforts and for putting together such a comprehensive reply. I think there's enough information there to keep me busy and stop me asking questions. For a while at least!!!

    Cheers Kevin.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Microlight Exams

    Kevin O'Connor wrote:

    Thanks for the replies everyone,
    Hi Martin.
    Thanks for the advice.As a beginer, and someone who hasn,t had a lesson yet, how would I know which bits to ignore?
    I wouldn't want to fill my brain with stuff that's usless to me when there's barely enough room for the useful stuff!!!
    Cheers, Kevin.

    To find out which bits are relevant you will need a copy of the Microlight NPPL Training Syllabus to check against to books. You can obtain that here
    http://www.bmaashop.org/
    As most folks have said almost everthing that you will need is in Brian Cosgroves book. The main exceptions to this are in Air Law as ammended in an ANO published this year. You can find this in the files section of the Microlight Yahoo group
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/microlights/
    listed as
    ANO 2008 BMAA.pps
    or as suggested in an earlier reply in Geoff Weighell's book Air Law for Microlight Pilots by AFE
    One thing that a lot of people find a challenge at first is that aviation is splattered with acronyms. A lack of understanding of these when used in flying books and speak can slow the learning process so you may find this site useful
    http://www.pplmania.com/ppltrainer/glossary-terms-c.htm
    Something else that could prove useful would be to obtain a "whizz wheel", chart, ruler and protractor and a marker pen (Staedtler permanent will dry wipe from a chart) and do a load of practice navigations you will be able to get the days weather from the met office site useing TAFs and Forms 214 and 215
    http://secure.metoffice.com/aviation/report.jsp
    and get used to useing the AIS site for NOTAMS.
    http://www.nats-uk.ead-it.com/public/index.php.html
    Once you get used to it it's quite easy
    Not only will this help you pass your Nav. exam it will help you once you have your licence
    I know that this assumes that you are conected to the web, but I hope that it may help
    Ginge[/quote]

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Microlight Exams

    Thanks for the replies everyone,

    Martin Watson wrote:

    Cosgrove certainly is essential, but I feel it only really covers the basics. The AFE series of books for private piot training worked well for me - they are aimed at General Aviation wannabee pilots, but cover stuff in more detail and you can just ignore the bits you dont need. The Air law for Microlights book I referred to earlier is from AFE too.

    Martin
    Hi Martin.
    Thanks for the advice.As a beginer, and someone who hasn,t had a lesson yet, how would I know which bits to ignore?
    I wouldn't want to fill my brain with stuff that's usless to me when there's barely enough room for the useful stuff!!!
    Cheers, Kevin.

    Leave a comment:


  • Martin Watson
    replied
    Microlight Exams

    Cosgrove certainly is essential, but I feel it only really covers the basics. The AFE series of books for private piot training worked well for me - they are aimed at General Aviation wannabee pilots, but cover stuff in more detail and you can just ignore the bits you dont need. The Air law for Microlights book I referred to earlier is from AFE too.

    Martin

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Microlight Exams

    Kevin that all depends on the in Individual, i would say its a "must" to have to grasp the basics, but me Personally 'of only average intelligence' had one hour in the classroom with the instructor, and two hour classroom on the navigation. alf.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Microlight Exams

    Martin Watson wrote:

    Nothing to stop you doing a lot of theory reading and learning while you have the time
    Hi,

    Just a quick question. Does Brian Cosgroves Microlight Pilot's Handbook give you enough information to pass all the exams? If not what other books would it be benificial to study?

    Cheers kevin.

    Leave a comment:


  • Martin Watson
    replied
    Microlight Exams

    Guys

    I just looked this up in "Air law for Microlight Pilots". A pass in a theory paper has a validity of one year.

    So, as long as you can complete your practical learning and pass the GFT (practical test) in less than a year of taking and passing the theory tests, then everything will be OK. But this is not generally how folk do it, because you really don't know how long its going to take you to get the flying lessons and experience you need - UK weather being what it is. It would be a shame to have to take them again if you dont complete the GFT in time. Also as John said the theory makes more sense when it can be reinforced by practical demonstration and so on.

    Nothing to stop you doing a lot of theory reading and learning while you have the time in your hot and sandy place to get a really good understanding of things, come back to UK and get started with flying lessons, and then revise and take the theory exams as your flying progresses.

    Winter is a good time for flying lessons (surprisingly) cos no bumpy thermals to confuse things, and you often get gin clear days when it is fantastic flying. BTW if you have done the work the theory exams are pretty straightforward - no trick questions, just giving you the chance to show that you know what is needed.

    Good luck

    Martin

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Microlight Exams

    Alf, I don't think there is a time limit as my lessons and exams were spread over a year of evenings and weekends, but I wouldn't lay my life on it ;-)
    John

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Microlight Exams

    Dave as far as i can recall you can take them any time with your instructor but i think there is a time limit on there validity, my way of thinking is that you can do them whatever the weather, not like the flying. best to space them out in stages with your flying and do them on the bad weather days. alf.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Microlight Exams

    Dave, you can take them at any time that you like but you will find them more difficult if you haven't done the relevent lessons.
    John

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a topic Microlight Exams

    Microlight Exams

    Hi Guys and Gals

    In 3 weeks time i am off to a hot, dry and very sandy place for my 4 month 'inforced' summer holiday. I will have loads of time to study and learn the 5 exam modules (Air Law, Aeroplanes Technical, Navigation, Meteorology, and Human Performance and Limitations). The question i have is, on my return am i allowed to take the exams before i start flying lessons and obtain a certificate to prove i have done them (a bit like doing a car theory test, only these are more important), or do i have to take them at certain stages of flight training?

    Sorry if it seems a daft question, but with all that time on my hands i want to do something creative with it.

    Regards

    Dave
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