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  • Swing-Europe

    I was looking at http://www.luftmofa.de/ today (English translation, courtesy of Google, at: http://translate.google.com/translate?prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.luftmofa.de%2F&sl=de&tl=en&history_state0= ). Looks very nice, and light enough for SSDR, leading to questions:
    • Has anyone any experience of this aircraft?
      * With the current SSDR rules, is there anything nowadays that would stop one importing something like this? (I remember seeing posts about noise certification, but also another saying that is no longer necessary?)

    [oops translate from German works better]

    mfc

  • #2
    Swing-Europe

    Mike..
    There is nothing in the "rules" to stop you importing and flying anything... even a winged motorised bed.. as long as it is less that 115Kg without pilot and fuel and has less that 10Kg/Msp wing loading.
    I too have been looking at importing an aircraft for use under SSDR and yes, the requirement for a noise certficata HAS been removed at present under the ANO byexemption which is due to expire in June.

    "This exemption shall have effect from the date on which it is signed until 30 June 2009."

    Then who knows, I believe the exemption has only been implememnted because at present facilities for testing are not widespread, so is likely to resurface.
    I cannot concieve that SSDR Microlights will be exempt in the long term, whilst heavier Microlights are not.
    The CAA schedule for noise testing standard are still extant.

    I do suggest that if you do import, you register with HM Customs as an "end user" thus avoiding Gordon (spit) Brown's import tax.
    I am not sure of the sale price, but in any case it is not suitable for import via Denmark (to avoid Gord0n Brown's VAT) as it does not have a rudder!!!!!!!
    Good luck

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    • #3
      Swing-Europe

      Very many thanks, both, for the clarifications. This definitely opens up more possibilities than I had realised (and, sigh, thereby complicates things :-)).

      The machine in question sounds as though it is still really at the prototype stage .. but interesting, nevertheless (it meets the weight and loading numbers, and I'm a fan of 4-stroke engines, for several reasons).

      Mike

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      • #4
        Swing-Europe

        Jeremy,

        I got a note from the CAA last June to say the exemption was due to expire 1.7.08, and where was my noise cert? Fortunately, it was a Chaser and had an approved combination. I don't know whether the exemption was extended.

        I see noise as a bit of a deal-breaker for the slower SSDR machines. As you probably know, they integrate against time the noise profile exceeding 70dBA (AFAIR) during the overpass at 500ft.

        Dave

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        • #5
          Swing-Europe

          Latest exemption expires 30 June 2009.. not long:-(
          CAA Microlight noise standards and measurement procedure

          http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2008/uksi_20083133_en_5

          Comment


          • #6
            Swing-Europe

            I've done a few noise tests now - from a bunch of pre-section-S stuff in the mid 80s to prop changes on later kit. In the early days, they used a Polaroid camera to confirm height (from wingspan extrapolation) at the directly overhead, midpoint, and would take away the readings for analysis on a 'big' computer. They'd tell you later if you passed.

            The last one I did was performed completely on the CAA's Peter K's local laptop, and immediately gave me a result that was 1dB over the limit. Out with the spanners and another degree of coarseness brought me comfortably inside. I think a digital camera was used for height confirmation that time, and any height error was immediately compensated for in the Excel spreadsheet. For aircraft that won't stay level at take-off power (actually full throttle), the instruction was to try to pass through 500ft immediately overhead, but stay within a 400-600ft band.

            As an aside, on the last one, I'd done some previous tests with a SPL meter and a laptop, doing overflights with the manufacturer's prop to establish a 'legal' benchmark. I then fitted my new one and repeated it and got substantially quieter results (3dB less). I naively assumed I'd fly through the official noise test, and was gobsmacked when I failed. So much for standards...

            Dave

            Comment


            • #7
              Swing-Europe

              Jeremy,
              Excellent observation.
              Well done.
              Dave

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