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  • Powered Parachutes

    Hello chaps.

    I have just been looking at a powered parachute and this looks like a nice cheap method for SSDR.

    I wonder if anyone can answer the following questions?

    If you were to build an SSDR powered parachute and wanted to subsequently develop a 2 seater what would it have to meet to be legal in the UK. Ive looked through this website as much as possible and looked at the CAA website but cannot seem to find the answers?

    If anyone can provide me with a weblink that would be great.

    I am presuming it would be section S but how would this relate to Paraplanes/Powered Parachutes?

    Also where can I get a copy of the syllabus of instruction for learning to fly the above.

    Cheers

    David

  • #2
    Powered Parachutes

    Self Propelled Hang Glider or Foot Launched Microlight experience to NPPL(Microlight) (Powered
    Parachute)

    The holder of a BMAA or BHPA Self Propelled Hang Glider or Foot Launched Microlight Pilot Rating
    who wishes to obtain a NPPL (Microlight) (Powered Parachute) shall:

    a. Produce log book or log sheet evidence of having completed at least 5 hours experience on
    foot launched SPHG or FLM aircraft in the 12 months prior to licence application;

    b. Hold a current BMAA or BHPA SPHG/FLM Pilot Rating;

    c. Complete the following flight training:

    (1) For applicants for the NPPL (Microlight) (Powered Parachute) with Operational
    Limitations, complete flight training of not less than 2 hours on Powered Parachutes
    under the supervision of an instructor authorised to conduct training for the NPPL
    (Microlight) (Powered Parachute), to include:
    (a) Not less than 1 hour solo PIC within the 9 months before licence application;
    (b) Not less than 15 take-offs and full stop landings, of which 6 must be solo PIC
    flown within the 9 months before licence application;

    (2) For applicants for the NPPL (Microlight) (Powered Parachute) without Operational
    Limitations, complete flight training of not less than 5 hours on Powered Parachutes
    under the supervision of an instructor authorised to conduct training for the NPPL
    (Microlight) (Powered Parachute), to include :
    (a) Not less than 5 hours solo PIC within the 9 months before licence application;
    (b) Not less than 15 take-offs and full stop landings, of which 6 must be solo PIC
    flown within the 9 months before licence application.
    (c) Navigation training, to include:
    (i) Not less than 2 hours solo PIC within the 9 months before licence
    application, including;
    (ii) One cross-country flight of at least 25 nautical miles during which the
    applicant landed at at least one other site not less than 10 nautical miles
    from the site of departure;

    d. Within the 12 months before licence application, pass the Microlight theoretical knowledge
    examinations in Aviation Law (Microlight), Human Performance and Limitations, Navigation,
    Meteorology and Aircraft General (Powered Parachutes);

    e. Within the 9 months before licence application, pass the oral examination in Aircraft Type
    (Powered Parachutes);

    f. Hold a valid NPPL Medical Declaration or JAR-FCL Class 1 or 2 medical certificate;

    g. Pass a Powered Parachute Flight Test with an Examiner authorised to conduct tests on
    Powered Parachutes.

    Comment


    • #3
      Powered Parachutes

      OFFICIAL CAA NOTICE :

      POWERED PARACHUTE
      All flying training must be carried out under the supervision
      of a flying instructor holding a valid AFI rating or a FI rating
      on the type of powered parachute on which the training is
      conducted. Solo flying may only be carried out when the
      flying instructor is present at the take-off site at which the
      flight commences.
      Flight in any powered parachute is acceptable and should
      follow either the dual training system for a two seat
      aeroplane or the solo training system for a single seat
      aeroplane.
      Applicants may obtain either an “unrestricted” licence
      or a “restricted” licence (which includes operational
      limitations).
      With Operational Limitations
      Applicants shall be required to produce evidence of having
      satisfactorily completed a course of training to a syllabus
      recognised by the CAA and pass a Flight Test. The
      syllabus of training must provide for a minimum of 4 hours
      of flight time in a powered parachute including not less
      than 1 hour as solo PIC and not less than 25 take-offs and
      full stop landings of which at least 6 must be as solo PIC
      in the 9 months prior to the date of application. In addition
      applicants will be required to pass a GFT. The Flight Test
      can be included in the minimum 4 hours of flight time.
      The licence will impose the following constraints on the
      licence holder:-
      Limitation 1:
      The licence is valid only for flights within the United
      Kingdom, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man; provided
      that it shall be valid for flights within the territory of other
      Contracting States with the prior written permission of the
      appropriate Authority of such States.
      Limitation 2:
      No person in addition to the pilot shall be carried in the
      aeroplane other than a qualified flying instructor in an
      aeroplane equipped with dual controls provided that where
      the pilot has gained not less than 15 hours experience on
      Powered Parachute aeroplanes, including not less than 6
      hours as solo PIC and such experience has been entered
      in his personal flying log book and has been certified by
      a person authorised by the CAA in writing to sign Cs of T
      or Cs of E in a Private Pilot’s Licence, then this Limitation
      (numbered 2) shall cease to apply.
      Limitation 3:
      No flight shall commence or continue unless:
      a. the surface wind speed is 10 knots or less, and
      b. there is no cloud below 1000 feet above ground level
      over the take-off site and over the planned route
      including the landing site, and
      c. the flight can be conducted in a flight visibility of not
      less than 10 kilometres.
      Limitation 4:
      The aeroplane shall not fly further than 8 nautical miles
      from the take-off site.
      Limitation 5:
      No flight shall commence or continue at night.
      Limitation 6:
      The aeroplane shall not fly over any congested area of a
      city, town or settlement.
      Note: The Limitation No. 2 will cease to apply without
      application to the Authority when the minimum flying
      experience quoted in the Limitation has been achieved.
      Limitations No. 3 & 4 will be removed from the licence, free
      of charge, on application to the Authority when the holder
      of the licence has obtained at least 15 hours experience
      in Powered Parachutes, including at least 5 hours training
      in flight navigation in Powered Parachutes, supervised by
      a flying instructor, within the 9 months prior to the date of
      application for the removal of the limitations. This navigational
      shall include two 25 nm solo cross-country flights,
      during each of which the applicant landed at least at one
      other site not less than 10 nm from the take-off site at
      which the flight began. The two-solo cross-country flights
      must be flown over different routes and to different sites.
      Without Operational Limitations
      Applicants shall be required to produce evidence of
      having satisfactorily completed a course of training to a
      syllabus recognised by the CAA and pass a Flight Test.
      The syllabus of training must provide for a minimum of
      15 hours of flight time in a powered parachute supervised
      by a flying instructor in a powered parachute. The total
      must include not less than 6 hours as solo PIC, not less
      than 25 take-offs and full stop landings of which at least
      6 must be as solo PIC, not less than 5 hours training in
      navigation during which at least 3 hours must be as solo
      PIC and must include two solo 25nm cross-country flights
      during each of which the applicant landed at least at one
      other site not less than 10nm from the take-off site at
      which the flight began. The two solo cross-country flights
      must be flown over different routes and to different sites.
      The hours laid down must be within the 9 months prior to
      the date of application. The Flight Test can be included in
      the minimum 15 hours of flight time.
      Credits from Flying Training
      Non-UK licence holders and military pilots who have
      previous experience on Powered Parachutes should
      contact the BMAA for details of any credits that may be
      given.
      Theoretical Knowledge Examination Requirements
      An applicant for a Powered Parachute licence is currently
      required to pass theoretical knowledge examinations in
      the following subjects:-
      1. Aviation Law, Flight Rules & Procedures
      2. Human Performance & Limitations
      3. Navigation & meteorology
      4. Aircraft (General)
      5. Aircraft (Type) (Oral as part of the GFT)
      Examinations 1, 2 and 3 are common to Microlights and
      Powered Parachutes. The Aircraft (General) and Aircraft
      (Type) are specific to Powered Parachutes.
      Credits from Examinations
      • The holder of a valid Non-UK Pilot’s licence
      (Aeroplanes) issued by another ICAO Contracting
      State may be credited the examinations in
      Navigation, meteorology, Aircraft (General) and
      Aircraft (Type).
      • A QSP in the UK Armed Forces may be credited
      the examinations in Navigation, meteorology and
      Aircraft (General).
      • A holder of a valid UK or another ICAO Contracting
      State’s Flight Navigator’s Licence and UK Military
      Navigators may be credited the examinations in
      Navigation and meteorology.
      Flight Test
      Applicants are required to pass the General Flight Test
      conducted by a CAA authorised PPL Powered Parachute
      Examiner in a Powered Parachute.
      C6.4 NPPL MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS
      An applicant for a NPPL shall hold a valid NPPL medical
      declaration (DVLA Group 1 or Group 2 Standard) or a JARFCL
      medical certificate. For full information regarding the
      medical requirements please refer to the CAA web site at
      www.caa.co.uk.
      Re-validation
      In order to revalidate a NPPL, the holder requires a
      valid aircraft class rating and valid medical certificate or
      declaration, appropriate to the NPPL, at the time of revalidation.
      For the revalidation requirements for NPPL aircraft class
      ratings, please refer to Section F6.

      Comment


      • #4
        Powered Parachutes

        Non SSDR compliant powered parachutes have to meet section S - which contains specific paragraphs for parawings. The trike unit has to follow the generic requirements applicable to trikes, and fixedwing - landing gear, engine mounts, seats, harnessess etc

        Paul

        Comment


        • #5
          Powered Parachutes

          PS section S on CAA website - CAP 482

          P

          Comment


          • #6
            Powered Parachutes

            Hi Davy,
            I think you will find that AAA Microlights could do tutition for you
            Give Chris Hassell a call. Get the number from the web site below.

            http://www.aaamicrolight.com/


            Hope this helps
            Regards
            Simon

            davy bolam wrote:
            Hello chaps.

            I have just been looking at a powered parachute and this looks like a nice cheap method for SSDR.

            I wonder if anyone can answer the following questions?

            If you were to build an SSDR powered parachute and wanted to subsequently develop a 2 seater what would it have to meet to be legal in the UK. Ive looked through this website as much as possible and looked at the CAA website but cannot seem to find the answers?

            If anyone can provide me with a weblink that would be great.

            I am presuming it would be section S but how would this relate to Paraplanes/Powered Parachutes?

            Also where can I get a copy of the syllabus of instruction for learning to fly the above.

            Cheers

            David

            Comment


            • #7
              Powered Parachutes

              thanks for all the replies. CAP482 is certainly an interesting read lol.

              Comment


              • #8
                Powered Parachutes

                Also check out http://www.powrachute.co.uk/ -- they import the Powrachute Voyager, which is SSDR. Unfortunately their website needs some work, and their promised monthly newsletter has been a bit quiet, but the Voyager is a real PPC (by which I mean it has some sort of a cage to protect the pilot, and the parachute controls are foot-operated, so you have your hands free for charts, GPS, sandwiches, etc ....).

                I'd be very interested in a lightweight European-style PPG trike with foot controls, but I don't think one exists :-(

                Mike

                Comment


                • #9
                  Powered Parachutes

                  Hello,

                  Would I be correct in thinking that a powered parachute is not the same as a paramotor? I ask because it is not obvious to me whether the aircraft type being discussed is footlaunched or wheel launched. I would hope that the posts above only refer to wheel launched aircraft, otherwise the imposition of a licence for running around a muddy field seems a bit harsh.

                  Best regards,

                  Bob Hood
                  XL's forever! Well, one of them anyway. It's all I can afford, not to mention the Raven and the Mini-Max. Oh, and I almost forgot the Spectrum as well :-)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Powered Parachutes

                    Sorry folks,

                    Brainfade has taken over this afternoon. Of course it refers to wheeled aircraft otherwise you wouldn't be discussing SSDR versions. Doh!!

                    Best regards,

                    Bob Hood
                    XL's forever! Well, one of them anyway. It's all I can afford, not to mention the Raven and the Mini-Max. Oh, and I almost forgot the Spectrum as well :-)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Powered Parachutes

                      Paul D,

                      A quick check in Section S did not find the one difference on chute trikes to weightshift trikes that I had 'thought' I knew from when i first read Section S a long time ago. Can you help clarify:

                      My understanding is:
                      In the landing gear strength requirements there is allowed 2/3 mass reduction through lift reaction through the landing phase (s.474) so I was involved in drop tests at 1/3rd gross weight at the required drop height to get the speed - long time ago getting involved in putting aircraft through Section S tests in Australia.

                      But as the powered chute stopped lifting immediately on touchdown the 2/3 mass reaction for lift in undercart strength requirements was not allowed in powered chutes ... so the undercarriage for the chute trikes were actually designed to a higher reactive level than a weightshift trike...but I can't find that in the Section S.

                      Am I going mad on this or did the difference for powered chutes get changed to be the same as all other microlights?

                      Comment

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