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Winter flying from Grass Strips

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    Winter flying from Grass Strips

    sorry posted this in wrong section !!!!!!

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    Guest started a topic Winter flying from Grass Strips

    Winter flying from Grass Strips

    out of grass fields ranging from "fantastic" to "I'd never go in there agduring;">The grass was irrigated and kept well-manicured and was easy on tires One of the finest strips I have ever landed on is Popham, where, slowing down. The toughest was Nayland which also has a lot of The softest was Top Farm a grass strip near Royston.technique). The only good thing about it was that I didn't need to take off from there. [/b] most, as often my wheels would be that I could fly if I could get the nose to rotate and that I could facilitate lift and get full power before releasing the brakes and stick/yoke full back. Acceleration Now getting used to the Maule and actually any taildragging aircraft I have found that a firm grass runway for a tailwheel plane is much safer than tarmac, it's a lot more forgiving of slight crab angles on touchdown.Imagine the furore if you were flying a 'tailskid' off their perfect surface :-) to almost nothing .maintained grass runway is available there, I first used the tarmac runway to take off from, but always used the Grass runway to land on (thought it was actually trickier to take off from the tarmac than a grass field). The local climate and soil conditions, as well as the age of the established soil , has much to do with the firmness of a grass strip. Poor drainage and really tight clay soils can be soft most of the time unless it's a really dry area. Every grass strip is different. I use a number of them throughout the year, and I believe I know what to expect at various I think more accidents involve taking off from a grass strip by pilots who are used to pavement. The takeoff roll can be MUCH longer due to drag of the grass (depending on height, density, type and [/b] this topic recently and how failing to use the soft field technique solely because the strip was grass which was known to be hard could still be a dangerous move, I have always thought it best to always use the soft field technique and hopefully stay out of trouble

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